Once-trusted cadres reverse our progress

Public protector Busisiwe Mkhwebane.
Public protector Busisiwe Mkhwebane.
Image: SANDILE NDLOVU

It's confounding society that whenever the public protector releases the findings of an investigation against public representatives there would be a whiff of the conflict of interest or a violation of the executive ethics code.

Although these transgressions border on abuse of power fraught with corruption, the public protector hardly ever points the implication.

We know exactly it's rampant malfeasance, but the legalese is utilised in such a way that the finding would be deeply political and ideologically conceived. Perhaps, it's a case of seeking to be politically correct than to call a spade a spade.

It may well be a problem of appointing politicians to such office when there's a pool of retired judges and advocates of integrity to uphold the constitution in whatever circumstances. Are we emasculated to shake up the status quo?

Politicians cannot be allowed to put their interests above those of the people. While anarchy replaced activism in communities, crass materialism swept politicians along to be frenziedly obsessed with flaunting bourgeois lifestyle in the face of the poor people.

Not surprisingly, the new phase of the struggle is materialistic in outlook and veering onto a destructive path to supersede the political significance of the national democratic revolution.

Historically, colonialism changed the course of African nationalism which saw leaders hoodwinked by fraternisation to be servile towards settlers through a bestowal of gifts.

Nowadays, capital interests influence politicians by patronage to have the upper hand to decide on important national matters. Worryingly, it's the trusted cadres who give permission to be captured to reverse a slew of promising milestones in the country.

In fact, it's their fault that everyday challenges stay the same as before.

Morgan Phaahla, Ekurhuleni

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