Love the missing ingredient for chef Siphokazi

Mdlankomo has been waiting for the day when her Prince Charming will sweep her off her feet.
Mdlankomo has been waiting for the day when her Prince Charming will sweep her off her feet.

They say the way to a man's heart is through his stomach.

And with her amazing cooking skills, celebrity TV chef Siphokazi Mdlankomo can melt any man's heart.

But sadly, the 43-year-old host of Let's Eat With Siphokazi on DStv channel 161 has been struggling in the love department.

Mdlankomo has been waiting for the day when her Prince Charming will come and sweep her off her feet.

Speaking to Sunday World this week, the mother to a 23-year-old son said she was longing to fall in love and be treated like a queen.

"Every woman deserves a man who looks at her every day like it's the first time he laid his eyes on her. I guess I'm no exception but that doesn't mean I am desperate for a man. The right one will come along one day," she said.

Siphokazi said she has been single for the past three years but hinted that her hectic work schedule, which involves travelling between Cape Town and Joburg shooting episodes for her TV show, might be to blame for her loneliness.

"A relationship needs your full attention. Right now I would need an understanding man because I don't think I can give my all to a relationship because of my busy schedule," she said.

For now, the soft-spoken chef said she was enjoying the relationship she has with her son, Buchule, and was trying her best to be a good mother to him.

Having worked as a domestic worker in Cape Town for a decade before her fortunes turned around, Mdlankomo said she was grateful for the opportunity to have her own TV cooking show.

"It's a dream come true. Who would have known that a rural girl like myself would host her own TV show one day? I feel blessed," she said.

While working as a domestic worker, she said, people often made nasty comments about her "lowly job".

"People look down on you the moment you tell them what you do for a living. It was really hurtful. Some would tell me to go and do ABET instead of being a domestic worker.

"In their minds, being a domestic worker is all about washing your employer's underwear and cleaning toilets. But I'm grateful for the opportunity to be a domestic worker because I learned a lot from it and it prepared me for bigger things."

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