Eben Etzebeth matter clouds Boks' play

The writer says that it's a known fact that in most of the small towns of our country, the racists and bigots always get away with murder, particularly when they are celebrities or some people of standing in the community.
The writer says that it's a known fact that in most of the small towns of our country, the racists and bigots always get away with murder, particularly when they are celebrities or some people of standing in the community.
Image: Steve Haag

The stunning performance by the Springboks in the Rugby World Cup in Japan is overshadowed by the serious racism allegations against lock forward Eben Etzebeth.

This guy from Langebaan in Western Cape and his gang of criminals, who call themselves the "Wolf Pack", have been terrorising the community, including using racial slur and physical assault.

What's astonishing is that these guys have never been brought to book. It's a known fact that in most of the small towns of our country, the racists and bigots always get away with murder, particularly when they are celebrities or some people of standing in the community.

The police are reluctant to open cases or assist the victims. If they are brought to book, the judiciary gives them a slap on the wrist.

We've come a long way as a nation to have such racist individuals within our midst, particularly on the national team, representing us on the biggest international stage.

We can't - as the country - go back to the dark days of apartheid and discrimination.

The generation of the Springboks team of 1985 who were the first to lift the Webb Ellis Cup on home soil, made sure that South Africans conquer the demon of discrimination and apartheid and set our nation on the right path to unity and equality.

Therefore, by not recalling Etzebeth back home, the South African Rugby Union leadership is playing to the narrative that they are complicity in supporting the racist bigot. How dare they sacrifice the sweat and hard work of the other players and the nation at large just for one person?

Mafika Siphiwe Mgcina, Sedibeng

Would you like to comment on this article or view other readers' comments? Register (it’s quick and free) or sign in now.

Speech Bubbles

Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

X