Who are the real essential workers?

Japan's Naomi Osaka at the Australiann Open. The writer says the country's decision to include tennis players as essential workers is obviously a financial one, with the amount of money that has been paid for TV rights and advertisements.
Japan's Naomi Osaka at the Australiann Open. The writer says the country's decision to include tennis players as essential workers is obviously a financial one, with the amount of money that has been paid for TV rights and advertisements.
Image: KELLY DEFINA

The Covid-19 pandemic has shown us who is essential, but sometimes it is surprising. The more obvious people are anyone involved with medical services and food distribution employees.

Some of what could be considered second-level essential people would include journalists, public transport employees, some manufacturing jobs and even liquor sellers; but the list in Australia also includes tennis players, well at least the professional ones competing in the Australian Open.

The only obvious essential component of the tennis professionals is the financial one with the amount of money that has been paid for TV rights and advertisements.

Teachers aren't really considered essential although as a retired teacher, I can say that view preceded the pandemic times. Really, the list should only include those that keep us safe and healthy.

Dennis Fitzgerald, Melbourne, Australia

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