Moral compass in SA is mislaid

Hlamolani Vukeya, Russel Khuzwanyo and Patric Vukeya during the memorial service of the late Constable Nhlamulo Vukeya in Protea South. The family told police minister Bheki Cele that they learnt of Nhlamulo's death through social media.
Hlamolani Vukeya, Russel Khuzwanyo and Patric Vukeya during the memorial service of the late Constable Nhlamulo Vukeya in Protea South. The family told police minister Bheki Cele that they learnt of Nhlamulo's death through social media.
Image: Veli Nhlapo

It is disturbing to notice that many users of social media can no longer differentiate between bad and fair publication.

Some people get killed without getting any help from onlookers who witness the killing, instead we would be taking videos to share on social media platforms.

Our moral ethic has deteriorated to a point that we choose to post someone's death even before the family is notified by those in authority.

Recently a police officer was shot and killed at Nancefield hostel in Soweto only for the victim's family to learn about his death on social media.

That is unAfrican and bizarre.

The police have a component comprising chaplains and social workers who are professional in dealing with grieving families. However, their job is compromised by the people who run to social media platforms to break the news.

We need a policy to regulate what gets published on social media.

Some of the things that need posting, such as the attacks on police officers and the rapes of women and children, always escape our attention and end up not being shared on social media because we tend to engage in a conspiracy of silence.

Let us not escalate the trauma to those already experiencing such and not deviate from our morals.

Andries Monyane, Vaal

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