'Active case' graph in Western Cape begins to head in right direction

The Cape Town International Convention Centre's Hall 4 is part of the temporary Hospital of Hope opened for Covid-19 patients. Active cases in the province are showing signs of slowing down.
The Cape Town International Convention Centre's Hall 4 is part of the temporary Hospital of Hope opened for Covid-19 patients. Active cases in the province are showing signs of slowing down.
Image: Esa Alexander

A key statistic in the Covid-19 pandemic in the Western Cape has begun to show a downward trend.

On Tuesday, active confirmed cases in the province were 15,160, with an average daily decline of 47 cases over the past 14 days.

The daily change in active cases (blue line) in the Western Cape has begun to trend downwards (red line).
The daily change in active cases (blue line) in the Western Cape has begun to trend downwards (red line).
Image: TimesLIVE

Active cases have fallen 14% since they reached their peak of 17,612 on July 6.

Other statistics are also showing encouraging trends in the Western Cape, including the rate at which the number of infections doubles. The provincial doubling rate is 31 days, compared with 14 days for the whole country.

Mortalities in the Western Cape have increased by 32.5% in the past fortnight, while the national growth rate is twice that.

And 78% of people diagnosed with Covid-19 in the Western Cape have recovered, compared with 48% nationally.

Only 1,600 people are in provincial hospitals, compared with a high of 1,887 on July 4. Of those, 300 are in intensive care or high care, down from a high of 328 on July 4.

Treatment with high-flow nasal oxygen has helped numerous Western Cape patients to recover. Premier Alan Winde said on Wednesday the province was using 29 tons of oxygen daily.

"We are using approximately 60% of the available oxygen supply, so we have sufficient supply margins available in the province," he said.

Winde, a type 2 diabetic who was diagnosed with Covid-19 last week, said he had been resting as much as possible.

"I am feeling significantly better today, and both my blood sugar levels and my temperature are down. I am still isolating at home and taking all the necessary precautions because I fall into a high-risk group."


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