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READER LETTER | Do rallies reflect party’s popularity?

A general view of as South African President Cyril Ramaphosa delivers his speech at the African National Congress Election Manifesto launch in Durban, South Africa, February 24, 2024.
A general view of as South African President Cyril Ramaphosa delivers his speech at the African National Congress Election Manifesto launch in Durban, South Africa, February 24, 2024.
Image: ROGAN WARD

The political landscape in SA is undeniably captivating, with recent events shedding light on the dynamics of public support and engagement. The turnout at political rallies has sparked much discussion, prompting questions about the true implications of these massive gatherings.

The recent spectacle at the Moses Mabhida stadium, where the ANC proudly presented its election manifesto to a sea of enthusiastic supporters, was a sight to behold. The sheer numbers in attendance raise the question: does this reflect the genuine popularity of the party, or could there be darker forces at play behind such a show of support?

Similarly, the EFFs rally, which drew significant crowds just a week before, adds another layer of intrigue to the political landscape. Are these rallies drawing from the same pool of supporters, indicating a shared base among the ANC and EFF, or do they each have a broad and diverse catchment area of their own?

As if the political arena wasnt already bustling with activity, the emergence of uMkhonto Wesizwe and the enduring presence of Inkatha (Freedom Party) further complicate the narrative. These additional players bring new perspectives, ideologies and allegiances into the mix, creating a multifaceted tapestry of political engagement in SA.

With each party vying for the attention and support of the electorate, the competition is heating up, promising an exciting and unpredictable journey ahead as the country navigates the complexities of its democratic process.

As voters weigh their options and parties vie for their allegiance, the true test lies in the ability of these political entities to connect with the hearts and minds of the people they aim to represent. Maybe the Tintswalo's will have the last laugh.

Mpilo Moyo, email


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