Why is it that the media keep on blaming Cyril?

The very same people who blamed President Cyril Ramaphosa for the deaths of miners in Marikana are now blaming him for not acting and allowing people to loot and damage infrastructure, says the writer.
The very same people who blamed President Cyril Ramaphosa for the deaths of miners in Marikana are now blaming him for not acting and allowing people to loot and damage infrastructure, says the writer.
Image: Alon Skuy

When Cyril Ramaphosa was elected on a ticket of fighting corruption, the SA media were all over him, putting pressure on him to act against corruption within the ANC.

The president did act in the form of ensuring that law enforcement agencies are rebuilt to be able to fight this scourge, especially in the ANC.

As was expected, those who were benefitting from corruption did not sit by idly and watch Ramaphosa take them to task. They launched a fierce fight-back, which has culminated in the events we saw during the last two weeks in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng.

Now all of a sudden the SA media is now accusing the president of weakness and dragging the country into ANC factional battles. They call him all sorts of names as if they had expected the corrupt to just sit back and watch the president deal with them.

Secondly, the president has for years been accused of killing people in Marikana because he asked for “concomitant action” against those who were killing other miners.

Now during the unrest, the police didn’t act forcefully; they avoided a situation where many people could have been killed during the violence.

Now the very same media is again blaming the president for not acting and allowing people to loot and damage infrastructure. Had the police acted and people died in numbers, the president was going to be blamed again.

Linda Styles Ntuli, Protea Glen, Soweto

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