Let's inculcate culture of paying

We have a constitutional duty to replenish the national kitty via taxes, tariffs and user-pay for service delivery, the writer says.
We have a constitutional duty to replenish the national kitty via taxes, tariffs and user-pay for service delivery, the writer says.
Image: Leon Swart/123rf.com

The land and rich mineral deposits mined from it, buildings, plants, wild and domesticated animals, rivers and their fishes we see in SA, are resources of both the government and private businesses, including individuals.

The state and enterprises use and employ these living and non-living things either in a good way for their continued existence or in a bad way, resulting in the organisation being closed down. They are, therefore, called employers for a good reason.

We have heard of many employers downsizing, restructuring, diversifying, applying stringent debt collecting and austerity measures so that the final balance of their account is healthy.

Simply put, the amount of money received by an employer is more than money spent - a situation we are striving for in South Africa.

It is surreal to wish away gantries on our freeways. Whether acquired wrongly or not, they form part of our national assets. We have to pay when we use these upgraded roads to obtain the much-needed revenue.

If we can allow ailing state-owned enterprises to be perennially bailed out, why don't we inculcate a culture of payment as responsible shareholders? Thereafter, we the masters can look deep into the real problem, our servants (elected political parties), and shed liabilities.

We have a constitutional duty to replenish the national kitty via taxes, tariffs and user-pay for service delivery. The stewards' role is to ensure their mandated work (service delivery) is completed and done promptly.

Though our public purse is used extravagantly and we are badly treated by those we entrusted with power, we do have the ability to fight back as present and not absent masters.

Thami Zwane, Edenvale

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