Shameful judicial warfare is going on

Profound disagreements which were unheard of even in court corridors are now being heard in loud voices in the courts precincts, the writer says.
Profound disagreements which were unheard of even in court corridors are now being heard in loud voices in the courts precincts, the writer says.
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Senior judges at the highest level of our judiciary are at war with one another. Judicial warfare is in full progress, with character assassination being a weapons of choice. Our courtrooms have become judicial arenas of contest.

A few aberrations are enough to create that perception which, especially in judicial matters, is more important than reality. In the current battle of the judges, core values and perceptions are a casualty. It is worrisome that our judiciary is in the midst of an unprecedented crisis.

The judiciary in our country, considered pious and the ultimate hope of the downtrodden, seems to be passing through an evolving crisis. This sacred institution, considered incorruptible, and manned by men and women of integrity, is facing a crisis of character.

Profound disagreements which were unheard of even in the hallowed corridors of the courts are now being heard in loud voices in the courts precincts.

The apparent growing trust deficit between various senior judges and society at large has added yet another dimension to this exploding crisis. Judicial integrity is difficult to come by and might easily slip away if the public and the legal profession are not vigilant.

Any aberration in the judicial standards by anyone manning the judicial seat is noticed by our vigilant public and it becomes of serious concern to the entire country. It is often said that the conduct and character of a judge is reflected in his or her judgments.

The organ of government that bears a primary responsibility in the protection and enforcement of our constitution is the judiciary. Our untainted judiciary should always bear in mind their role as the last hope of the common man.

Farouk Araie, Johannesburg

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