KZN warned to brace for more rain as mop-up operations after Wednesday's storm begin

Suthentira Govender Senior reporter
A hailstorm swept through Pietermaritzburg on Wednesday afternoon covering parts of KZN's capital in a blanket of white.
A hailstorm swept through Pietermaritzburg on Wednesday afternoon covering parts of KZN's capital in a blanket of white.
Image: Amanda Khoza

KwaZulu-Natal has been warned to brace for more heavy rain and possible mudslides on Thursday, as mop-up operations begin in areas hard-hit by Wednesday's thunderstorm.

Trees were uprooted while vehicles and buildings were damaged during the severe storm that ripped through the midlands on Wednesday.

“Disaster management teams have begun with mop-up operations following the storm that brought hail which damaged buildings and vehicles. Heavy rains coupled with strong winds also occurred and caused localised flooding with uprooted trees,” the provincial  co-operative governance and traditional affairs (Cogta) department said.

“Some of the affected areas include Pietermaritzburg, Ndwedwe, Maphumulo and Mandeni, where disaster management teams have been deployed to conduct assessments. In these incidents, zero fatalities have been reported so far.”

The department said Cogta MEC Sipho Hlomuka has directed disaster management teams to remain on alert as large parts of the province are “expecting a disruptive amount of rain from this afternoon going into the evening”.

“The weather warning received from the SA Weather Service indicates that rain could lead to localised flooding in low-lying areas, roads and bridges.

“The inclement conditions could also result in mudslides.”

Zululand, uThukela, uMkhanyakude, Amajuba, Harry Gwala, uMgungundlovu, iLembe and the eThekwini metro could be affected.

Hlomuka cautioned residents to avoid crossing flooded walkways and bridges.

“We expect that driving conditions on our roads could deteriorate and we are urging motorists and holidaymakers to be patient and drive with caution,” he said.

“We have directed disaster management teams to monitor areas that are prone to weather-related incidents so they can respond faster.”

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