Land must be shared in an inclusive manner - Motsepe

Chairperson of the Motsepe Foundation Patrice Motsepe, left, have a word with Reverend Frank Chikane during an announcement of the National Day of Prayer in Sandton, Johannesburg, yesterday.
Chairperson of the Motsepe Foundation Patrice Motsepe, left, have a word with Reverend Frank Chikane during an announcement of the National Day of Prayer in Sandton, Johannesburg, yesterday.
Image: SANDILE NDLOVU

Mining magnate Patrice Motsepe says the solution to the land debate is to make land available to blacks in the rural areas and urban areas.

This, he said, would ensure that black and white farmers have a future together.

Motsepe was speaking during the announcement of a National Day of Prayer by the Motsepe Foundation in Sandton, Johannesburg, yesterday.

The foundation, which was joined by 33 religious and faith-based organisations, announced that they will host a second annual National Day of Prayer for all South Africans on November 25 at FNB stadium.

They will pray for land reform discussions to result in land being made available for black people, among others.

Motsepe, who was joined by his wife Dr Precious Moloi-Motsepe, said land must be shared in an inclusive manner.

"We have to make land available to blacks in the rural areas and urban areas.

"We do so in an inclusive manner that creates a future for everyone," he said.

Motsepe said part of the mistakes that were made in the past were that a "lot of money was spent on buying farms for communities but all of that went to blacks who are politically connected".

"One of the biggest mistakes we did was that the government buy land and leaves that black farmer and black communities on their own and walks away, you can't do that.

"Part of the things that we are learning is that you have to give land opportunities to black people in the urban areas and in the rural areas but we have to be there for them; that is why we are holding hands with black and white farmers.

"[Both] black farmers and white farmers must have a future," he said.

Motsepe said the rich and wealthy had a responsibility to ensure that the unemployed and marginalised are part of the economy.

"... God says you are all my children. The amount of time we spend running our businesses and making a success of them, we must have equal time if not more for the marginalised, unemployed poor and give hope to them. I am confident that the prayer will bring us together.

"The gathering will also pray for the end to poverty, corruption and crime, particularly crimes against women and children," Motsepe said.

Catholic Church's leader Archbishop Buti Tlhagale said they need to pray that men acknowledge the dignity of women.

"Pastor [Timothy] Omotoso (on trial for rape) represents in many ways all of us gathered here. He represents us because we stand out there and claim to speak on behalf of God, on behalf of Jesus Christ, and be the other God..." Tlhagale said.

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