Ready to tell all in capture probe

Deputy Chief Justice  Raymond Zondo leads the probe into state capture.
Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo leads the probe into state capture.

"I am ready to testify," one of President Jacob Zuma's critics told Sowetan yesterday.

"It is up to the commission to invite people. Commissions of inquiry invite people to testify," said the former Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) CEO Themba Maseko yesterday after Zuma appointed the commission of inquiry into state capture.

Maseko said the establishment of the commission, headed by Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo, was long overdue. "It is more than one year late. It was about time that it was established."

On Tuesday night, Zuma, pictured right, dropped a bombshell when he announced a commission of inquiry into state capture.

Zuma's announcement follows the North Gauteng High Court ruling that the remedial action recommended by former public protector Thuli Madonsela in her state capture report was binding. Zuma is appealing the ruling.

Constitutional law expert Pierre de Vos, however, said Zuma was not bound by Madonsela's remedial action as he is still appealing the high court judgment.

"We find ourselves in a strange situation. If his appeal against the high court judgment is successful, the appointment of the commission of inquiry will be unconstitutional and invalid and would have to be disbanded. If it fails, the inquiry can go ahead."

Maseko, along with axed deputy finance minister Mcebisi Jonas and former ANC MP Vytjie Mentor, have spoken out about the Gupta's state capture attempts.

In 2010, Maseko revealed how one of the Gupta brothers demanded that he use R600-million of government money for the family's media company. Maseko snubbed them and it was not long before his GCIS contract was terminated.

Repeated attempts to get comments from Jonas and Mentor were unsuccessful.