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TMPD probing police seen passing in traffic controlled by a school pupil in viral video

The TMPD is investigating after two of its vehicles were seen passing through traffic controlled by a school pupil. File photo.
The TMPD is investigating after two of its vehicles were seen passing through traffic controlled by a school pupil. File photo.
Image: Tshwane media team

The Tshwane metro police department (TMPD) is investigating officers seen passing through traffic controlled by a school pupil in a viral video. 

In the video, an unidentified pupil can be seen directing traffic in the Tshwane CBD. Two TMPD patrol vehicles can be seen passing by in the traffic.

The video was captured and shared on social media by @davidjabulanikgomo and has garnered more than 3.8-million views.

TMPD spokesperson Isaac Mahamba told Daily Sun it was aware of the trending video. 

“We can confirm the vehicle belongs to the department and those members are indeed our employees. We have since identified them and we are in a process to request them to furnish us with statements to explain what happened on that day. We will take it from there, and we don't rule out the possibility of internal disciplinary processes,” said Mahamba. 

“This is dangerous. Not only to themselves but to other motorists as well. Community members are encouraged to report traffic faults on 012 358 7095/6.”

In Johannesburg, the city's transport MMC Kenny Kunene said he was open to training homeless people in “healthy conditions” to direct traffic during load-shedding. 

This after mounting calls from frustrated motorists who expressed their anger at load-shedding affecting traffic and causing delays and congestion on roads. 

Kunene said while there is no plan to train homeless people to direct traffic during load-shedding, he is looking at consulting with private companies to come on board. 

“The homeless, you must have seen some of them are very tipsy when they control traffic and they could be opening both lanes because they’re not talking to each other.

“We will look at those who are in a healthy condition to train, but I think my input with the MMC of public safety is we perhaps partner with the companies that are going to work with us and come up with a model that one insurance company has done and see how they can assist us in terms of adopting some traffic intersections where they will also take care of those controlling traffic. At this point there is no plan from my side to train them,” said Kunene


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