Zuma 'plotter' Elvis Ramosebudi guilty of incitement to commit murder

Elvis Ramosebudi was on Tuesday convicted on two counts of attempting to incite to commit conspiracy to commit murder.
Elvis Ramosebudi was on Tuesday convicted on two counts of attempting to incite to commit conspiracy to commit murder.
Image: ALON SKUY/ THE TIMES

The 34-year-old Soshanguve man who was arrested on charges of conspiring to kill prominent South African politicians thought to have benefitted from state capture has been found guilty of lesser charges. 

Elvis Ramosebudi was convicted in the Johannesburg magistrate’s court on Tuesday on two counts of attempting to incite to commit conspiracy to commit murder. 

This was after he conspired to attack politicians in their homes and making their assassinations look like botched house robberies.

He was found guilty of sending letters to Nicky Oppenheimer, former chairman of Anglo American, asking for funding to stage a coup. He also wrote to businessman Ajay Gupta.

The letter to Oppenheimer‚ dated October 25 2016‚ details Ramosebudi's assassination plans‚ the targets of which were then president Jacob Zuma‚ his son Duduzane and 17 other high-ranking politicians and prominent South Africans.

Under the heading "Let’s Help Save South Africa"‚ the letter reads: "It is now in our hands as the Anti-State Capture Death Squad Alliance to request financial assistance and support for the amount of R60-million in order to finance our undercover coup plot mission to assassinate Jacob Zuma and his entire state capture regime."

The letter provides a Standard Bank account number and also a list of the targets. It is signed by the suspect.

The court heard at previous appearances that former state security minister David Mahlobo‚ former Free State premier Ace Magashule and former mineral resources minister Mosebenzi Zwane were the first three people Ramosebudi allegedly wanted to assassinate.

The alleged assassination plans were in documents police found in Ramosebudi’s home in Soshanguve‚ north of Pretoria.

Ramosebudi was arrested after a visit by an undercover policeman who pretended to be interested in helping him. Their meeting was secretly recorded and filmed.

Ramosebudi allegedly told the undercover officer that he wanted to use food poisoning and a sniper rifle to assassinate his targets.

Magistrate Collin Matshitse said Ramosebudi was found guilty of incitement and not conspiracy to murder because the letters he sent did not reach the intended recipients. 

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