Nehawu doubtful of watchdog plan

GOOD INTENTIONS: KwaZulu-Natal premier Zweli Mkhize, right, with transport, community and liaison MEC Willies Mchunu, arts, sport and culture MEC Weziwe Thusi and cooperative governance MEC Numusa Dube at a meeting at the provincial legislature. PHOTO: SIYABONGA MOSUNKUTU. 27/02/2010. © Sowetan.
GOOD INTENTIONS: KwaZulu-Natal premier Zweli Mkhize, right, with transport, community and liaison MEC Willies Mchunu, arts, sport and culture MEC Weziwe Thusi and cooperative governance MEC Numusa Dube at a meeting at the provincial legislature. PHOTO: SIYABONGA MOSUNKUTU. 27/02/2010. © Sowetan.

THE National Education, Health and Allied Workers Union said yesterday it was sceptical of the proposed plan to monitor the performance of public servants in KwaZulu-Natal.

THE National Education, Health and Allied Workers Union said yesterday it was sceptical of the proposed plan to monitor the performance of public servants in KwaZulu-Natal.

The union was responding to premier Zweli Mkhize's initial proposal in his state of the province address.

On Saturday Mkhize's proposal was again outlined by ANC chief whip Nonceba Molwele.

Molwele said at a Lekgotla in Johannesburg at the weekend that public servants would be monitored to clamp down on negligentgovernment officials.

Molwele cautioned public servants that they would be strictly disciplined if they were found guilty of negligence, laziness, corruption and ineffectiveness.

Nehawu spokesperson in KwaZulu-Natal Sizwe Pamla said it was the wrong time for the performances of workers be monitored.

"Workers are working under constant pressure because of vacant positions," Pamla said.

"We welcome such action. But we insist that unions must be briefed on how this monitoring would be conducted without victimising workers."

Pamla said the monitoring process must not only focus on workers but also on managements.

"It must not be used as a tool to target certain departments while favouring others," he said.

He cautioned that the mechanisms to carry out the monitoring were not yet in place. He said workers needed to be provided with assistance before being assessed and held accountable for lack of service delivery. "Workers must also be listened to."

"I think it's a good thing that performance will be monitored," said Nelizizwe Nhlapho, a nurse at a provincial hospital.

"But the shortage of equipment and staff makes our job difficult."

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