Fines should benefit poor

From bread-making companies to oil giants such as Sasol, all have been found guilty of contravening the competition laws by colluding and fixing prices to the detriment of the poorest of the poor.

From bread-making companies to oil giants such as Sasol, all have been found guilty of contravening the competition laws by colluding and fixing prices to the detriment of the poorest of the poor.

Not so long ago Tiger Brands was fined about R10million and recently Sasol was fined in excess of R2billion, but these fines did not benefit poor people.

When Tiger Brands was fined, a loaf of brown bread cost about R6,50, but after being penalised, the price still went up to R9,00, which is more or less what consumers are paying in Pretoria.

This suggests that companies are happy to pay the fines and then continue as usual.

I believe that over and above the fines, the competition commission should force companies to drop their prices.

The exorbitant fines should be used to help consumers. I do not have a blueprint on how to go about doing that, but those employed to protect consumers should ensure that consumers benefit from the fines.

If this was to happen, one would see the prices of food drop significantly, Sasol products reflect that they are manufactured in South Africa and all those managers who are found guilty of causing such strife to the poor must be prosecuted and thrown in jail.

Makhiwesizwe Motha, Sunnyside

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