Anger of locals understandable

While politicians draft rhetorical speeches and academics dust off their dictionaries in a bid to find profound terms to condemn xenophobia, the present crisis continues.

While politicians draft rhetorical speeches and academics dust off their dictionaries in a bid to find profound terms to condemn xenophobia, the present crisis continues.

Whether xenophobic or criminal, we have to admit that all violence demonstrates the perpetrator's anger towards the victim.

The majority of South Africans have for more than a decade hoped that political freedom would bring economic freedom, only to see their situation deteriorate.

The violence against foreigners manifests the critical disparities of South Africans living in moderately poor conditions. The influx of mostly Zimbabweans is unquestionably uncontrollable, but the violence is despicable.

Without justifying the situation, it's not surprising that the uncontrolled influx of immigrants would anger some. Foreigners do not live in suburbia, but in already overcrowded townships and informal settlements.

Accepting lesser remuneration packages adds to the frustration among locals.

The violence reveals the unhappy marriage between the rhetoric of equality and tolerance underlying their enlightened ideals on one hand and the reality of unresolved crimes of the past, institutionalised discrimination and corruption and inequalities on the other.

Philile Ntuli, Pretoria

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