Know your candidate: Cyril Ramaphosa carries promise of unity

ANC deputy president Cyril Ramaphosa is favoured by the majority of ANC branches to win the party's presidential race.

Next leader of the ANC? Cyril Ramaphosa’s road to power

ANC deputy president Cyril Ramaphosa is favoured by the majority of ANC branches to win the party's presidential race.

He is endorsed by a third of national branches‚ putting him ahead of all his competitors.

The 65-year-old is a seasoned politician who worked closely with Nelson Mandela in the negotiations to end apartheid.

He left active politics in 1997 and ventured into the corporate world. Many speculate the move was mainly inspired by the fact that he was disappointed that Mandela did not appoint him as his deputy after the first democratic elections.

Ramaphosa has attained a lot of success in business. He has served on a number of company boards‚ including Lonmin‚ which was embroiled in the 2012 Marikana massacre.

He marked his return to active politics in 2012 when he was elected as ANC deputy president in Mangaung‚ Free State.

He also serves as the country's deputy president.

Ramaphosa tossed his hat in the ANC presidential race under the campaign #CR17.

"Ramaphosa stands for the unity‚ renewal and rebuilding of the ANC and a return to the values of Mandela and Tambo. He stands for a strong and effective movement that leads the people in the fundamental transformation of the economy and society‚” said the #CR17 Campaign website.

The former trade unionist has promised to tackle state capture and corruption once he gets elected into power.

During his campaign rally he also promised to prioritise economic growth‚ job creation‚ education and land reform.

"We must make sure that the land is brought back to our people. Those who were removed from our land must have their land returned and those who stole that land must have that land returned back to our people‚” said Ramaphosa during an SACP Red Rally in October.

The #CR17 camp go into the elective conference more confident than others‚ but analysts have warned that branch nomination does not always translate into actual votes and the leadership race can still swing any way.

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