Clarity on problems at CGE

I AM certain that there will be few citizens, if any, including the commissioners in the Commission for Gender Equality, who will not welcome the Standing Committee on Public Account's commitment to see problems confronting the institution addressed.

I AM certain that there will be few citizens, if any, including the commissioners in the Commission for Gender Equality, who will not welcome the Standing Committee on Public Account's commitment to see problems confronting the institution addressed.

After the meeting between the CGE and Scopa on April 14 there have been a number of calls from journalists asking for comments on the meeting.

Until now I have declined to comment because I considered it highly inappropriate, given my own history and present engagement with the CGE.

Suffice to place on record that as far back as September 2007 discussions were held by CGE commissioners and management, some entailing bold proposals to address the problems in the institution.

As the crises continued the plenary of commissioners discussed at length the option placing the CGE under administration. Regrettably, despite obvious paralysis that was gripping the institution, institutional leadership in the CGE failed to rise to the challenge.

But in my capacity as its chairperson I held numerous conversations and correspondence was undertaken with key decision-makers on these proposals.

Documents exist to provide written evidence and show serious consideration of the state of affairs, as part of the plenary decision to explore options to address the challenges.

Given this history, as a citizen and as former chairperson of the CGE, I welcome the drive and commitment demonstrated by Scopa to address some of the problems at the CGE. But I hasten to add that the issues will require a carefully crafted but urgent strategy of intervention.

Correctly so, Scopa recognises that there is a need to include other decision makers, stakeholders, political and legislative principals.

Needless to say, as a former chairperson during the period under discussion, I remain committed to account to any properly constituted platform on the decisions made, choices and options during my term of office.

In the interest of the CGE as well as in the interest of my personal reputation, which has been maligned in various forums, without any substance to allegations and innuendo, I trust that the processes agreed by all parties, will afford me an opportunity to clarify and deal with these so that I can close this chapter of my life.

In the final analysis, South Africans, through their representatives and structures, have a duty and responsibility to examine the problems facing the CGE with honesty and openness, and put in place systems that can put this institution on the right path.

Nomboniso Gasa, Gauteng

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