SAA on the right route

WE HOPE the tasty bit by the SA Airways to throw the law at errant former executives is not pie in the sky.

WE HOPE the tasty bit by the SA Airways to throw the law at errant former executives is not pie in the sky.

For many moons the national carrier was kept going by taxpayers, while its chiefs spent piles of money on luxury.

Khaya Ngqula, the CEO who was forced out last year, forked out more than R200 000 on helicopter trips between Johannesburg and OR Tambo International airport.

He chartered a R100000 plane between France and England for a trip that would have cost R3800.

"Bullshit ... it's rubbish," he bellowed when quizzed on television about his R70 000 monthly bonus, excluding his R5,3million annual package.

Ngqula was lying, of course.

The cherry on the CEO's cake was the multi-million rand tender SAA allegedly granted his wife.

By the end of 2010 Ngqula and his "key staff" would have cost government R24million a year in retention bonuses.

For acolytes of former president Thabo Mbeki, SAA was, like other parastatals, a cash cow.

It was bling all the way , while countless other South Africans can barely afford a slice of bread.

And there has not been any consequences.

Soit was music to the ear when SAA confirmed yesterday that Ngqula's team could be hauled before criminal courts for poor governance.

After all, even some government officials are believed to be "eating" with impunity.

For once, here is a parastatal that now wants to stop corruption from continuing to fly in our midst.

We can only say ride on SAA, ride on!

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