Diamond Law research earns lecturer a doctorate

UNIVERSITY of KwaZulu-Natal graduate and senior law lecturer Fikile Ndlovu's doctoral research has received recognition on South Africa's Diamond Law.

UNIVERSITY of KwaZulu-Natal graduate and senior law lecturer Fikile Ndlovu's doctoral research has received recognition on South Africa's Diamond Law.

Ndlovu will be conferred with a PhD in Law at the university's Westville Campus today for her dissertation.

Her Analytical Study of the Regulation of South African Diamond Trade from 1994 to 2009 with Reference to Aspects of the 1996 Constitution is in the process of being adapted into a book.

Ndlovu believes that the book will make an invaluable contribution to the field of Maritime Law and Diamond Law.

The book, South African Diamond Law, is expected to include significant findings Ndlovu made while examining the country's Diamond Law.

She has identified as significant international and national trends to adopt "humane practices" in the diamond trade process.

She has also discovered that where good leadership existed, laws that governed a country's mineral resources were adhered to - and this avoided the manipulation of a country's mineral wealth.

Ndlovu said her book will contribute to more insight into Diamond Law. "I know this is a cliché, but knowledge is power and getting it can only improve us as a nation," she said.

Ndlovu, whose PhD research began in 2005, said her interest in law had been ignited by her passion for South Africa's natural resources and the work of a former law lecturer, Professor Hilton Staniland.

"The PhD has been a huge personal development tool. I will become a far better academic ... it is a new beginning, a journey that has been long, made me face myself and find ways to be the best I can be," Ndlovu concluded.

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