Albinism no stumbling block to success in life

CRUSADER: Nomasonto Mazibuko addresses pupils in Limpopo on
albinism. Pic: ELIJAR MUSHIANA. 


Nomasonto Mazibuko, chairperson of Albinism Society of Southern Africa (Assa), during the launching of 2009 essay at Ligege High school, Venda in Limpopo. PHOTOS: ELIJAR MUSHIANA. Circa. © Sowetan
CRUSADER: Nomasonto Mazibuko addresses pupils in Limpopo on albinism. Pic: ELIJAR MUSHIANA. Nomasonto Mazibuko, chairperson of Albinism Society of Southern Africa (Assa), during the launching of 2009 essay at Ligege High school, Venda in Limpopo. PHOTOS: ELIJAR MUSHIANA. Circa. © Sowetan

NOTHING can stop people with albinism from attaining ordinary and even extraordinary feats because albinism is not a disability, a human rights activist has asserted.

NOTHING can stop people with albinism from attaining ordinary and even extraordinary feats because albinism is not a disability, a human rights activist has asserted.

Albinism Society of Southern Africa (Assa) president Nomasonto Mazibuko said albinism was not a disability but a manageable inherited condition.

Mazibuko said people with albinism could even lead companies and institutions because albinism was not a stumbling block to success.

Speaking during the launch of this year's National Schools Essay Competition on Albinism at Ligege High School in Duthuni village outside Thohoyandou, Limpopo, Mazibuko said she was dismayed to hear that some parents in the province were still hiding their children who had albinism.

"Children with albinism are also normal because only the skin pigmentation and colour is different and they have normal brains and equal potential, if and when given an equal chance," said Mazibuko.

Worried that Assa lacked strong support groups from different parts of Limpopo, especially in the former Venda, Mazibuko asked Limpopo Disabled People's Organisation chairman Rapson Rambuwani to help remedy this disturbing situation.

"We are still shocked by the news of the gross discrimination against people with albinism in Africa, particularly the muti killings of about 40 people with albinism in Tanzania and the surrounding areas, including Burundi," said Mazibuko.

"We condemn the barbaric acts happening and will continue to advocate for the integration of people with albinism in those countries. For South African's with albinism, there seems to be some hope, especially with the introduction of a new ministry catering for women, youth and people with disabilities," she said.

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