Find solutions to protests

THE government and nation as a whole is facing a serious problem with boycotts in all walks of life.

THE government and nation as a whole is facing a serious problem with boycotts in all walks of life.

Any group that believes that it is not receiving fair attention from government departments resorts to boycotts, confronts the government with demands and deadlines and then threaten to down tools.

It is true that boycotts are a way of expressing dissatisfaction and anger but it is not the only way. Some people use them as political weapons when their financial or political interests are threatened.

What is even more alarming is that some protesters carry weapons. Though I have not seen these weapons used, one of them might just be tempted when they are confronted by law enforcers.

There are always two sides to any problem. I suggest we look at the demands of the many protests, most of which are about pay rises or fears of job losses.

The parties should develop mechanisms that are fair to both the economy and individual companies or government departments. Workers fear job losses, so a way must be found to include them in the new projects.

When new employees sign contracts there should be a clause stating how boycotts should be treated. There should also be proper ways to channel grievances. Together, all parties should find solutions to end this time- and economy- wasting boycotts.

Richard Mwaipungu, Durban

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