Analysts are all biased against JZ

Fikile-Ntsikelelo Moya's column refers. I agree with him that people who are not in favour of Jacob Zuma becoming South Africa's president should tell us why not.

Fikile-Ntsikelelo Moya's column refers. I agree with him that people who are not in favour of Jacob Zuma becoming South Africa's president should tell us why not.

Considering that so much was written on the succession debate before Polokwane, it is not unreasonable to expect that Zuma's critics should by now have mustered enough courage to tell us why he is not good enough.

Instead, we daily get nauseating innuendos, half truths and insinuations about him. But no one has said why, if he was good enough to be the country's deputy president not so long ago, he can't be the next president.

I hold no brief for Zuma and he no doubt has faults like everybody else. But it is most unreasonable for commentators to expect us to go along with their biased analyses.

I mean how does Prince Mashele, Thabo Mbeki's former speech writer, in all seriousness expect anyone to believe that he is objective as far as Zuma is concerned?

Another critic, Xolela Mangcu, has for some time given us names of leaders who, according to him, are suitable for the job, except Zuma. How can we believe that his analysis is not informed by prejudice and or other personal inducements.

I do not believe that there is one commentator out there who can claim to be neutral.

Bhungani Mzolo, Tshwane

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