Ways to help a reluctant child open up on the issue of teasing

If you suspect bullying but your child is reluctant to open up, find opportunities to bring up the issue in a more roundabout way.

If you suspect bullying but your child is reluctant to open up, find opportunities to bring up the issue in a more roundabout way.

Let your child know that if he or she is being bullied - or sees it happening to someone else - it's important to talk to someone about it, whether it's you, another adult (a teacher, school counsellor or family friend) or a sibling.

If your child tells you about a bully, focus on offering comfort and support, no matter how upset you are. Children are often reluctant to tell adults about bullying. They feel embarrassed and ashamed that it's happening.

Sometimes children feel as if it's their own fault, that if they looked or acted differently it wouldn't be happening.

Sometimes they're scared that if the bully finds out that they told things will get worse.

Others are worried that their parents won't believe them or do anything about it. - Kids Health

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