Reconnect with ancestors

A Millimetre of Dust: Visiting Ancestral Sites is a broadly researched travel memoir.

A Millimetre of Dust: Visiting Ancestral Sites is a broadly researched travel memoir.

Julia Martin knew exactly what she wanted to do while on her journey from Cape Town to the "undiscovered" Northern Cape.

While doing her research, she started reading about Kathu and other Stone Age sites in the area such as Canteen Kopje, Driekops-eiland and Wonderwerk Cave.

The sites are about 800000 years old.

Visiting the McGregor Museum, she entered a room where she found the remains of Khoisan people lying around in plastic bags - they had just been excavated.

Another interesting site she visited was Driekopseiland, a place marked with a multitude of more than 3500 engravings. It is believed that for more than 2000 years people have been going to Driekopseiland to engrave the rocks.

The Wonder-werk Cave site is open to the public and includes an interpretative centre adjacent to the cave. At the site, it reads: "the duration of a human life measures just a millimetre of dust in the deep, long accumulates of sediment, yet each breath we take connects us to those who came before us and all beings".

The first white owner, NJ Bosman, lived in the cave for seven years with his wife and children while the farmhouse was being built. The cave is 17metres wide and stretches up to 139metres.

For those interested in archaeology, the Wonderwerk Cave is a must-see place.

This book will answer many of the "did you know?" questions you might have about the province's ancestral history.

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