PAC is alive because ANC adopts its codes

One cannot write the PAC's obituary without having seen its corpse and for as long as the ANC adopts its policies, such as African Renaissance and Nepad, although the latter has flaws.

One cannot write the PAC's obituary without having seen its corpse and for as long as the ANC adopts its policies, such as African Renaissance and Nepad, although the latter has flaws.

The ANC abandoned the 1949 programme of action for the 1955 Freedom Charter, which Joe Slovo admitted in an interview in Lusaka and published in the US magazine, The New Republic, of November 1983, that he and his wife Ruth First wrote the Charter.

The split was ideological, said the PAC's founding president Robert Sobukwe in an interview in The Africanist of January 1959. He spoke about the differences between Africanists and Charterists and said our conception of the struggle differed radically from the ANC's. He said we were oppressed as the African nation. The ANC saw our struggle as a class struggle.

Author John Pilger in his book, Freedom Next Time, described the Freedom Charter as "an expression of hopeful liberalism rather than a blueprint to transform a repressed society".

The Charter repudiates the PAC's anti-colonialist stance of Africa for Africans by declaring that "South Africa belongs to all who live in it..."

We speak about a nationalist struggle and the ANC about a workers' struggle. We are vindicated by the ANC's adopting our policies. As long as our policies are relevant, the PAC can't be said to be dead.

Sam Ditshego, Kagiso

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