Fiddling in the fire

If the chief executive of a private company were accused of sexual abuse, especially after an investigation by a committee of its board, you can bet your bottom dollar disciplinary hearings would be instituted immediately.

If the chief executive of a private company were accused of sexual abuse, especially after an investigation by a committee of its board, you can bet your bottom dollar disciplinary hearings would be instituted immediately.

Not at Armscor. There the accuser has been put on leave for more than a year, costing taxpayers almost R1,5million, while her bumbling boss plunges the government's arms-procurement company in one crisis after another.

More than 50 of his senior managers have signed a document protesting against his autocratic and inefficient management.

When parliament stepped into the fray company chairman Popo Molefe falsely told the MPs that investigations had not been completed.

The MPs tripped him up and he soon conceded that the probe had been completed, that a report had been submitted and that it had been approved by the board.

As reported by Sowetan last month, the report recommends that chief executive Sipho Thomo be suspended and face a disciplinary hearing - and that his accuser, Nthati Borotho, get back her job as general manager of corporate affairs.

We commend the parliamentarians for trying to unravel the mess at Armscor. But now they should also hold Molefe's feet to the fire for trying to deceive the public.

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