The right way, but make it work

A public service that is able to deliver seamlessly and promptly is an ideal that all citizens unconditionally expect from government departments.

A public service that is able to deliver seamlessly and promptly is an ideal that all citizens unconditionally expect from government departments.

After all, this is the core business of government and a measure by which it is constantly assessed by the civil society without compromise.

But, as taxpayers will attest, the public service often does not measure up to lofty service commitments that adorn government hallways.

The reality is that complaints about poor public service are as perennial as government commitments to provide Utopian levels of service delivery.

Giving content to the value proposition between government and citizens remains a big challenge. Hence the significance of the latest campaign by the government to educate South Africans on their service rights.

Launched by Public Service Minister Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi yesterday, the campaign uses a booklet to create awareness on citizens' rights to services from government departments. It also informs the public of avenues to follow when those rights are infringed.

While the campaign is a step in the right direction, Fraser-Moleketi must be reminded that its success lies primarily in uncompromisingly enforcing accountability and stamping out corruption in the public service.

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