Moseneke should know better

The hatchet between the ANC and Dikgang Moseneke might have been buried, but the judge was wrong to imply that his quest for an equal society was not necessarily what the ANC delegates in Polokwane wanted.

The hatchet between the ANC and Dikgang Moseneke might have been buried, but the judge was wrong to imply that his quest for an equal society was not necessarily what the ANC delegates in Polokwane wanted.

The judge might hold lofty views about equality, but being no ordinary intellectual and a member of our highest court, he must be careful what he says.

Democracy is about what the people want. This is the common denominator. The actual social, political and economic systems are but instruments indicating this democratic expression.

What is even more worrying about the arrogance of the judge's speech is that his mission in life is more noble than the democratic expression of the conference "delegates" as convened by South Africa's majority party.

These are tendencies of dictators who think they know best what people want, by giving themselves a licence to rule against the people's will, in the name of the good of society.

The ANC delegates know what people want. There is no superior voice than that. It is the same voice that determines the judge's constitutional standing in society. By the way, that voice can change the very same constitution from which he presupposes his lofty views about equality.

Our constitution is hailed the world over, partly because these "delegates" have over the years fought for its hegemony. Yet he sarcastically rubbishes them. Perhaps the learned judge should be pardoned because he has said that he was misunderstood. But he should know better than to say things at the height of excitement, because as a judge we look up to his sober mind for justice.

Phillip Musekwa, Leondale

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