Let players gain from the windfall

South African Premiership soccer bosses are naturally smiling from ear to ear with more and more sponsorships coming into the league's coffers.

South African Premiership soccer bosses are naturally smiling from ear to ear with more and more sponsorships coming into the league's coffers.

This is despite the fact that some of them openly threatened to go to court to challenge any individual trying to get a 10 percent commission for a successful deal.

The brouhaha over the commission comes after the PSL signed a R500 million sponsorship over five years for the league with banking institution, Absa.

The new sponsorship came just a few weeks after the Premier Soccer League announced a record five year R1,5 billion broadcast deal with SuperSport International.

It is a known fact that most companies are queueing to become involved in soccer in one way or the other ahead of the 2010 World Cup.

The arrival of the traditionally Afrikaner banking institution at a higher level will definitely add more confidence by the corporate world into local soccer.

Kaizer Motaung has, for many years, argued that it did not make sense for the league winners to get R2,5 million first prize.

His argument stems from the fact that the Telkom Knockout Cup pays a first prize of R4,25 million, despite the winners playing only four games.

Me thinks Motaung is spot on because the league championship is a marathon over almost 11 months, you play a total of 28 matches.

I was excited to hear Irvin Khoza, PSL chairman, say the league winners will now get more than double what the competition cited above gets.

While yours truly congratulates Khoza, Motaung and others in the sponsorship committee for a job well done, I honestly hope the players will also benefit a great deal.

Expect for a few players, it is well known that there are many players who still earn less than R10 000 a month.

Still on the issue of players, club owners also need to get experts to guide their employees on how to invest money rather than buying a fleet of flashy cars and being proud party-animals.

Five or six years down the line, the majority of such players rely on hand-outs from friends and relatives, and worse still with no houses of their own.

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