DNA boost for Spector

LOS ANGELES - A forensic scientist has told the court during the murder trial of Phil Spector, pictured, that DNA consistent with the music producer's genetic markers was discovered on shooting victim Lana Clarkson's breast.

LOS ANGELES - A forensic scientist has told the court during the murder trial of Phil Spector, pictured, that DNA consistent with the music producer's genetic markers was discovered on shooting victim Lana Clarkson's breast.

Criminologist Steve Renteria also told the Los Angeles hearing on Tuesday that the DNA was not present on the gun that killed Clarkson, on the bullets in the weapon or under her broken fingernail.

Renteria testified that a DNA swab taken from Clarkson's breast "yielded a mixed profile that was consistent with two donors. The major donor in that sample was Lana Clarkson herself - it's her own skin surface so one would expect that. The minor donor types were consistent with those originating from Phil Spector."

But the expert told the court he found no DNA consistent with that of Spector's on the gun or bullets in the firearm.

The testimony is good news for the defence, is who arguing that Clarkson killed herself. The lack of DNA on the gun suggests Spector didn't pull the trigger, and the absence of DNA match on the fingernail supports the theory that there was no struggle.

Spector has pleaded not guilty to the killing of Clarkson at his home in Alhambra, California, in February 2003. He claims she committed suicide.

The trial continues. - Wenn

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