Landmark ruling vindicates whistle blowers

In the past eight years I have dealt with many whistle blowers who lost their jobs. Some were intimidated into resigning, some were ignored in the workplace and their work taken away from them while others had their contracts terminated.

In the past eight years I have dealt with many whistle blowers who lost their jobs. Some were intimidated into resigning, some were ignored in the workplace and their work taken away from them while others had their contracts terminated.

This is what whistle blowers have to endure for doing the right thing. But now a blow has been struck for the cause of whistle blowing.

A few days ago, labour court judge Daya Pillay slammed former justice minister Penuell Maduna in a landmark ruling in favour of a whistle blower Maduna had fired.

Maduna and Scorpions boss, Vusi Pikoli, formerly the Justice Department's director-general, were sued by the department's former deputy director-general, Mike Tshishonga who lost his job after he disclosed corruption and nepotism in the liquidation industry, as well as Maduna's insistence on having a friend, Enver Motala, appointed in lucrative cases.

Pillay also criticised the public protector, auditor-general and the minister in the presidency, Essop Pahad, whom Tshishonga had called in to resolve the impasse, for not probing the allegations.

I take my hat off to all honest employees who blow the whistle and to the judge for ruling in such a way that Tshishonga will get a year's salary and have his legal costs paid.

Hermene Koorts

Johannesburg

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