Sowetan has double standards on criminality

Sowetan's commitment to the rule of law is baffling. In the same week that President Thabo Mbeki urged South Africans to dedicate this year to fighting crime, Sowetan glorifies criminality. On January 5, in "Judge Floors The Champ", Sowetan disregarded all it said during the 16 Days of Activism for no Violence Against Women and Children. In a page dedicated to a murderer, shock is expressed at a "too harsh" punishment for a "charming champ" by a judge who got it "wrong". The article said he was found guilty and sentenced to 35 years for attempted murder, armed robbery, possession of an unlicensed firearm and ammunition. What I know from the article is that the nameless victim died at the hands of someone who "stole her heart". She might not have been famous, but for the court, constitution and the law, she had a right to life. She was a human being, a mother, a sister, a daughter.Your editorial said: "There are many reasons why people might resort to harming their loved ones when relationships go awry, but violence does not solve the problem." How disingenuous. Mr Editor, in a country that gives more space and time to convicted criminals, vilifies those who speak against corruption and immorality, where victims of crime are maligned, won't those who heed the president's call be run down? Sipho Ngwema, Gauteng glorifies criminality.

On January 5, in "Judge Floors The Champ", Sowetan disregarded all it said during the 16 Days of Activism for no Violence Against Women and Children. In a page dedicated to a murderer, shock is expressed at a "too harsh" punishment for a "charming champ" by a judge who got it "wrong".

The article said he was found guilty and sentenced to 35 years for attempted murder, armed robbery, possession of an unlicensed firearm and ammunition.

What I know from the article is that the nameless victim died at the hands of someone who "stole her heart". She might not have been famous, but for the court, constitution and the law, she had a right to life. She was a human being, a mother, a sister, a daughter.

Your editorial said: "There are many reasons why people might resort to harming their loved ones when relationships go awry, but violence does not solve the problem."

How disingenuous. Mr Editor, in a country that gives more space and time to convicted criminals, vilifies those who speak against corruption and immorality, where victims of crime are maligned, won't those who heed the president's call be run down?

Sipho Ngwema, Gauteng

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