RESPECTED BY COMRADES AND FOES ALIKE

IF, as Rudyard Kipling wrote, he were not an astute politician and a credible public office representative nor the medical doctor with one of the sharpest minds in the country, Molefi Sefularo would have raised equal praise as a family man.

IF, as Rudyard Kipling wrote, he were not an astute politician and a credible public office representative nor the medical doctor with one of the sharpest minds in the country, Molefi Sefularo would have raised equal praise as a family man.

The late deputy health minister is being honoured throughout the country as a politician who won admiration from both comrade and political foe as a committed leader and administrator.

He will be remembered, hopefully, when all South Africans regardless of socioeconomic status will have access to quality and credible healthcare the day government eventually implements the much-anticipated National Health Insurance.

Sefularo is credited with championing this ambitious if critical tenet of a democracy such as the one built by South Africans.

Molefi, the husband, father, brother and grandfather, carried a disarming humility and warmth that made him as much the family cornerstone as he was in public life.

He was as supportive a husband to Kgomotso as he was loving and instructive to his children Bonolo, Masechaba and Ipeleng.

Like all doting grandfathers, the most tender message must be left for his grandchild, through whom the family legacy is destined to continue.

In the course of the week, as is customary in African tradition, the family were reminiscing and sharing their experiences with family, friends and visitors coming to pay their respects.

One of his sisters recounted how, only two days before his death, he visited the graves of all his family and relatives in Potchefstroom, North West.

The next day he spoke from the heart at a family gathering during which he implored the young in the broader family clans to follow their dreams, but more importantly, to pursue a good education.

He strongly urged them to shun drugs and other fashionable trends that have seen our country's youth set themselves on a path to destruction.

He was soft-spoken when he addressed the family but, as usual, the steel import of his message was successfully rammed home as would a velvet clad iron fist.

Dr Molefi Sefularo leaves a legacy on which our democracy has found a concrete foundation.

He will be buried tomorrow.

X