I do, I do, till lovers us do part

BEIJING - Ten months after they tied the knot, Li Lei and Wang Yang, both 20-something Chinese professionals, decided it was time to break up so they could spend more time with their lovers.

BEIJING - Ten months after they tied the knot, Li Lei and Wang Yang, both 20-something Chinese professionals, decided it was time to break up so they could spend more time with their lovers.

They signed on the dotted line on their divorce paper less than 20 minutes after answering "no" to a few key questions - "Do you have kids?" and "Any disputes on property?"

China's economic growth has created a generation of "emperors" and "empresses", the now-adult children of China's one-child policy, who often put their needs before anything and anyone else.

Experts say many of this generation are unable to sustain relationships, a result of being spoilt as only children, doted on by parents and grandparents who catered to their every whim.

"They are weak in horizontal bonding, communicating with the same generation," said Professor Fucius Yunlan, a psychiatrist who runs counselling sessions in Beijing.

"They tend to apply a vertical approach to horizontal relationships."

With an enlarged sense of entitlement, some of these couples tend to part quickly. Counsellors say some marriages fall apart after a week or a few months. - Reuters

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