EX-DOMESTIC RUNS THRIVING BUSINESS

NONDYEBO Mashiyi has a vision - to open a factory in Cape Town's poverty- stricken Masiphumelele, where she will employ black women from the community.

NONDYEBO Mashiyi has a vision - to open a factory in Cape Town's poverty- stricken Masiphumelele, where she will employ black women from the community.

The long-time resident of Masiphumelele informal settlement, about 25km from the city centre, was a domestic worker just 13 years ago.

But she trained herself as an artist and now is an art dealer and the owner of Nondyebo Art in the upmarket Waterfront.

She told Sowetan that her salary as a domestic worker was low and she could not support her three children.

"In 1994 I was earning R400 a month and I felt I wanted to start a business of my own but I didn't know what it was and I did not have the money," Mashiyi said.

Three years later her mother, from Matatiele in Eastern Cape, sold a cow to finance Mashiyi's first business venture - making hand-painted tablecloths.

Mashiyi said she went to buy paints and the material and started painting. That was the beginning of her success.

She now buys art books to see how she can mix colours, and then comes up with her own designs. Her tablecloths are even exported to Europe.

She now employs all three her sisters - Zodwa Sulani, Nontethelelo and Xoliswa Mashiyi.

Mashiyi is also working in collaboration with the Masiphumelele Corporation, which sponsors brilliant young pupils to further their education.

Talking about her future plans for the business, Mashiyi said she hoped to open a factory and employ more women from her community.

Meanwhile, Mashiyi said she was producing more tablecloths with the hope of making extra money during the World Cup.

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