Years waiting for title deed

WAITING for a house to be transferred into your name can be upsetting if it does not happen and your conveyancer does not update you about developments.

WAITING for a house to be transferred into your name can be upsetting if it does not happen and your conveyancer does not update you about developments.

Having to wait five years is even worse if your husband has died.

Dudu Nhlapo of Springs, Ekurhuleni, has waited since 2005 for her attorney to transfer her property into her name.

Reporting Wessel-Rossouw and Rossouw Attorneys to the Law Society of the Northern Provinces has not helped because she claims her attorney later coerced her into agreeing to write a letter contradicting her complaint.

The attorney said he did not know what was causing the delay and offered to investigate.

"That coming from a conveyancer is very disturbing, especially when I have complained to the law society about it," Nhlapo said.

Nhlapo's problem started in 2005 after her husband passed away.

She said she was referred to this law firm by a magistrate and told they specialise in conveyancing.

She did not have money to bury her husband and Rossouw gave her a loan of R13942 until she could access her late husband's account.

She said after she received his pension fund she notified her attorney, who later told her to deposit R79602 into his bank account, which she did.

She said R48529,37 was to be paid into her bond account.

"I owed the law firm R7000 on the loan they gave me and the rest was paid towards transfer and legal fees," Nhlapo said.

Although she deposited the money in 2006 the attorney only paid her bond a year later.

"This was after the bank had threatened to repossess my house."

Nhlapo said after paying R48529,37 towards her bond, she waited for her title deed. When she did not receive it she reported the matter to the law society.

At that stage her bond was in arrears of R20916, which the attorney only paid after receiving a letter from the law society for comment, she said.

"I am still waiting for him to change ownership. I am tired of this and feel helpless," she said.

Nhlapo said her attorney was now ignoring her phone calls.

Rossouw confirmed he received payment to pay Nhlapo's bond and to register the house in her name.

He said Nhlapo actually owed R70000 towards her bond and the R48000 she paid did not liquidate the full outstanding balance.

He said after Nhlapo reported her compliant to the law society they held a meeting. He said they then paid what was owing on her bond in full and final settlement.

He denied that he forced Nhlapo to write a letter to the law society to withdraw her complaint.

He said his office gave instructions to law firm Matsemela Krauses & Ngobeni Incorporated to proceed with the transfer last May.

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