ID woes bring lives to a halt

A CANCER patient might lose a chance of a lifetime to undergo a major operation to remove a brain tumour.

A CANCER patient might lose a chance of a lifetime to undergo a major operation to remove a brain tumour.

This because the infamous Home Affairs Department has issued her with the wrong ID book.

Nozibusiso Nomtyala is scheduled to undergo an operation that could save her life next month.

But this might not happen unless the department gives her the correct ID book.

"I am so frustrated because the hospital refuses to help me is I don't have the right ID," says the Eastern Cape-born Nomtyala.

Her woes started in 1994 when she was issued with an ID book bearing the wrong names.

"I sent it back and it was returned with the correct names but the wrong ID numbers," she says. "In May I spoke to an official in Pretoria but he has yet to come back to me."

Home Affairs spokesperson Cleo Mosana says Nomtyala's case will be treated as a priority.

In another incident a young woman's life is in ruins after she found out she was married to a foreign national without her consent.

Dimakatso Mphatsoe can't apply for a job or driver's licence or open an account.

"My whole life has come to a standstill," says Mphatsoe of Leondale in Ekurhuleni.

She says she discovered the situation when she went to apply for a passport in June.

"They told me I married Olanrewaju Mutiu Adebayo in 2004," she says. "I was told that my passport would be issue under that person's surname."

She was recently shortlisted for an internship at a reputable IT company.

Now the company is no longer interested and she thinks it is probably because of the ID.

"Without an ID book, a person is as good as dead," she says.

Mosana says Mphatsoe's case will be investigated as soon as they receive her complaint.

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