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Jordaan to focus on Legacy Project

By unknown | Apr 25, 2007 | COMMENTS [ 0 ]

Ramatsiyi Moholoa

Ramatsiyi Moholoa

Danny Jordaan, the LOC chief executive, will use tomorrow's Sowetan Extra Time to update South Africans on the 2010 World Cup.

The popular monthly gathering, which is attended by various soccer stakeholders, will take place in Sandton. It starts at 6.30pm.

Jordaan will also deal with the challenges facing football in South Africa and on the continent after the 2010 World Cup.

This is where Jordaan will also touch on the importance of the Legacy Project, a directorate of the LOC that is headed by Eddie Maloka.

The LOC is using the Legacy Project to improve infrastructure throughout the country and create more state-of-the-art training venues in various communities.

"It is imperative that we keep our readers up to date with the latest developments surrounding 2010," said Molefi Mika, Sowetan Sports Editor.

"It is also vital that our readers know that our soccer hierarchy is not solely focused on 2010 but is aware of the necessity to maintain South Africa's footballing standards as a whole beyond 2010."

Jordaan will be the fourth senior soccer administrator to address Extra Time, a soccer forum hosted by Sowetan, The Famous Grouse whiskey and

The first gathering was addressed by LOC chairman Irvin Khoza, who spoke about the importance of hosting the World Cup.

Tumi Makgabo, the LOC's communications officer, was the next speaker after Jordaan could not make it because of other commitments.

Makgabo warned South Africans about investing money into businesses to benefit from the World Cup before discussing them with experts.

Trevor Phillips, the outgoing PSL chief executive, was the third speaker last month. Phillips said he was confident that South Africa will host a successful World Cup.

Extra Time is attended by some of the influential soccer and business people. Ordinary South Africans also use it to share ideas with some of their leaders.


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