I admire breweries for doing a better job at service delivery

15 July 2018 - 15:17
By Vusi Nzapheza
The government can learn a thing or two from South African Breweries, says the writer.
Image: Theuna Breugem/Gallo Images The government can learn a thing or two from South African Breweries, says the writer.

The Fifa World Cup comes to an end today, leaving us hung over and back to reality with a thud.

It has been an amazing tournament for the viewers and a welcome distraction from the skyrocketing fuel prices and Eskom's battle to keep the lights on as their workers withdrew their labour, which led to the dreaded load shedding in parts of the country.

Few punters would have guessed that France would face Croatia this evening in the finals as they were never among the favourites to lift the trophy.

Not surprisingly, South Africans found reasons to support countries on political grounds, such as which country supported the apartheid regime. Poland was derided for being Janus Walus, Chris Hani's killer's country of birth while France became Africa's favourites for the number of black players in their team. Forgotten was the country's imperialism and colonisation of several West African countries.

With Ramaphoria unable to lift the value of the rand and everything going up in price, we are back to being our moping self. It was my turn this week to become a moaning South African when I suddenly found myself without water.

I'm on a prepaid system and thrice I loaded my account without any reprieve from my tap. With indignation I called the notorious City of Joburg's call centre, where I was put on hold for almost 20 minutes while listening to a horrid tune. The most annoying thing is when you are told that your call is important but are nevertheless put on hold.

When I finally got through to a human being, I was blessed with a reference number but not a drop of water. At the time of writing, my toilet is out of commission while I have to run to neighbours with a bucket to meet my most basic need. I'm still waiting for a technician to be sent to diagnose and fix whatever problem that has denied me liquid relief.

Once again, the world-class African city has treated citizen Vusi with disdain. This has left me wondering whether I should cast my vote in the next election because it seems it does not matter who is in charge, the government is bound to fail to deliver services.

The leftist comrades are spooked by any talk of privatisation but the reality is that the government simply does not have the will to do what is right.

The private sector may not be perfect but I have never heard of a beer truck being delayed and leaving shebeens and taverns dry.

Come rain or sunshine, the beer truck will deliver and on time.

However, we've heard stories of clinics and hospitals running out of life-saving medication. When confronted with their failure, the stock reply is always that there are challenges which are being addressed.

Perhaps it is time we let the brewers deliver medication and other amenities.