COMMENT: EFF is no different from AWB

South African opposition Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) party Commander-in-Chief Julius Malema (C) leads members to storm the Gauteng Legislature Picture: AFP/GIANLUIGI GUERCIA
South African opposition Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) party Commander-in-Chief Julius Malema (C) leads members to storm the Gauteng Legislature Picture: AFP/GIANLUIGI GUERCIA

ONE has to reflect on how Nelson Mandela would have conducted himself in parliament today .

To do that, we need to take a short journey back into the history of the struggle, to the tense period between 1990 and 1994, when Mandela, as leader of the ANC, was engaging the National Party (NP).

He understood the terrain. It was a time to discuss and debate issues that were in the interest of the public.

Great gains had been made. These gains had forced the NP to the negotiation table.

The NP, then under the leadership of FW De Klerk, was stubborn, but Mandela understood that at the negotiation table he had to increase his debating skills and research on issues in order to win against his opponent.

He understood that you need no gun to debate.

The fight to gain space in the discussions concerning the future of this country was won back in 1994.

There is no need to keep disrupting parliamentary processes, because everyone has the right to vote and be voted for, and thereafter discuss issues in parliament.

There is no need to take the road of the Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging, as the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) is doing today.

Mandela was disappointed with Eugene Terre'Blanche's right-wing extremist movement, and he would be disappointed with the EFF's conduct today.

  • Kwazi Mthembu, Soweto
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