Petersen now qualified mechanical engineer

Chiefs keeper cements his love for cars with a degree

Sihle Ndebele Journalist
Brylon Petersen of Kaizer Chiefs during the Kaizer Chiefs media open day at Kaizer Chiefs Village, Naturena on May 15, 2019 in Johannesburg, South Africa.
Brylon Petersen of Kaizer Chiefs during the Kaizer Chiefs media open day at Kaizer Chiefs Village, Naturena on May 15, 2019 in Johannesburg, South Africa.
Image: Sydney Seshibedi/Gallo Images

Kaizer Chiefs goalkeeper Brylon “Lee” Petersen’s second-to-none passion for motoring  is the reason he's now a qualified engineer.

Earlier this week, Petersen etched his name into a very short list of Premier Soccer League players with tertiary qualifications after attaining his BSc degree in mechanical engineering from Wits University.

The 25-year-old from Pietermaritzburg laid bare how his love for cars inspired him to study mechanical engineering. Petersen's close connection with motors was also fuelled by Keith, his father's involvement in a trucking business.

“I have always been a lover of cars. I am also curious about how different cars were manufactured in terms of the processes. I like to get my hands dirty. I think my love for cars is the reason I am here today," Petersen said. 

“I am creative. I like how things flow to the next level. Engineering is a process, it's about what comes before the next thing. Obviously, football was also a passion but with my father doing a trucking business, it was easy to have a connection with vehicles.’’

Petersen is the middle son between two brothers,  30-year-old Bryce and Blake, who is 17.

The Amakhosi shot-stopper reckons family values played a telling role in his decision to still chase a degree even while playing professional football.

“Our parents love football. But their teachings are that education comes first that’s why I managed to go to Wits. My mom [Kim] has an economic background. My younger brother Blake is in matric this year,’’ said Petersen, who matriculated from Maritzburg College in 2013.

“Bryce has his own [amateur] football team that he’s coaching after getting his CAF licence but he’s also about to be a chartered accountant (CA)…I think he’s one module away."

Petersen admitted juggling football with his studies wasn’t easy.  

“[It] was tough, I won’t beat about the bush. But the key thing was discipline. I always had to be strict with myself when it comes to time management.’’

How does Petersen intend to use his degree?

“The degree is obvious a back-up plan. I must have something when my football career is done. But also I can’t sit with my degree because it’ll be irrelevant as time goes by.

“Let’s say I play soccer for 10 years from now; when I leave I try to look for a job and they tell me that my degree is irrelevant.

"So I want to go into corporate [business] as soon as possible, but as a part-timer or as a volunteer because I also want to play football.’’

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