All Blacks coach Hansen calls for introduction of guidelines to assist television match officials

Steve Hansen (Head Coach) of the All Blacks during the All Blacks Media Stand-Up at The Vineyard Hotel on October 02, 2017 in Cape Town, South Africa.
Steve Hansen (Head Coach) of the All Blacks during the All Blacks Media Stand-Up at The Vineyard Hotel on October 02, 2017 in Cape Town, South Africa.
Image: Ashley Vlotman/Gallo Images

All Blacks coach Steve Hansen has called for the introduction of protocols that will give broadcasters clear guidelines on how to assist television match officials (TMO).

In the last week World Rugby has announced measures to limit the use of the TMO but on Thursday Hansen was specifically asked about the often parochial role broadcasters play when decisions go under review.

“I can think of more than one example‚" he said.

"The one was Dan Carter (in Wales) and the other was Liam Messam here in South Africa.

"I think there should be a protocol but there isn’t‚ so you have to live with it.

"We are not complaining but it would be good if there was one.”

Rugby is not the only sport in which broadcasters can influence decision making processes.

SuperSport embarked on a healthy bout of triumphalism after their cameras caught Australia’s cricketers ball tampering last summer.

As one of the men that helped formulate World Rugby’s changes that will clip the TMO’s wings‚ Hansen gave his thumbs up to the process.

“The idea is to give the referee more control‚" he said.

"I think it is a great idea. The game doesn’t need a TMO running it.

"We need a referee running it with assistance from the AR’s (assistant referees) and the TMO.

“At the moment its ‘check‚ check‚ check‚ check’. Back in the old days nothing got checked and a few things got missed. That happens in swings and roundabout.

“If the ref hasn’t seen it and it isn’t blatantly foul play then let’s get on with it. He should still have the ability to ask for it if he wants.

"It’s a subtle difference between being told and him asking.

“It is a response to the fans‚ the players and the referees themselves. They all understand that we are wasting a heck of a lot of time on stuff we don’t need to waste our time on.

“Rugby people feel referees are starting to lose control of their domain. Over the last few years there have been examples of that.”

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