Xoliswa Chithani continues Ravele's legacy

Xoliswa Chithani is concerned about lack of opportunities for women boxers. / ANTONIO MUCHAVE
Xoliswa Chithani is concerned about lack of opportunities for women boxers. / ANTONIO MUCHAVE

It's been three years since Boxing SA's first female chairperson Muditambi Ravele emerged victorious in getting women's boxing going.

She made sure that women boxers dominated tournaments staged in August, which is Women's Month. It is a tribute to more than 20,000 women who marched to the Union Buildings on August 9 1956 in protest against the extension of Pass Laws to women.

But Ravele's war is still ongoing. This time Xoliswa Chithani - a fashion designer from Cala in the Eastern Cape - has continued where Ravele left off when her term in office ended in 2017.

"I am concerned about the future of women boxers in South Africa because they fight scarcely," said Chithani, who described herself as BSA licence manager.

Her 20-year-old daughter, Nontuthuzelo Chithani, is a professional boxer under trainer John Tshabalala at the Bonyeme Boxing Gym of Patrick Bonyeme in Johannesburg.

"Nontuthuzelo is one of the boxers that I manage," said Chithani, whose clients as a fashion designer include boxing ring announcer Sipho Mashego.

"I really appreciate Boxing SA's attempts to get women involved generally in boxing, but something needs to happen to change the mindset of people regarding women in boxing."

Women have made an impact in boxing since Violet Magwaca became a member of Boxing SA's board - the first in 2001 - after the demise of the South African National Boxing Control Board.

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