Car spinning ace Veejaro is changing the stereotypes haunting the sport

Car spinning ace, Vernon Hendricks.
Car spinning ace, Vernon Hendricks.
Image: Supplied.

Motor racing has existed in in Vernon Hendricks’s family through his father and grandfather, he has continued the legacy in the fast lane as the first ever Red Bull Shay’ iMoto victor.

 

The competition was held at Wheelz n Smoke in Johannesburg and saw 16 entrants duke it out for the prize which Hendricks took home after winning the competitions four gruelling rounds.

 

Hendricks, or Veejaro as he is popularly known, caught the motor bug in his youth through driving his father’s car. After entering his first competition at the Macufe Arts Festival in 2005, Veejaro has never looked back.

 

Veejaro’s journey to the Red Bull Shay’ iMoto competition was anything but smooth, after many delays and his wife giving birth shortly prior to the competition, Veejaro was under pressure to perform with a car that he was driving for the first time.

 

“I was in the toilet most of that week with butterflies in my stomach but we pulled it off.”

 

While his construction company has kept food on the table for his wife and kids, Veejaro shares that he still gets a lot of flak and stress being part of the drifting community. His family and community in Nigel have however shown immense support.

 

“A lot of people think we are hooligan, that we are wasting our money or that the sport is reckless,” says Veejaro who notes many communities where spinning takes place now boast arenas that are often packed with audiences, “no one has died because of spinning. No one has gotten hurt because of spinning but by the grace of God they will pull through and we will win them over.”

 

Veejaro also gushes that he hopes one of his children will follow in his footsteps.

 

“My wife and I had a small argument about that because I only have girls but I promise you one of them will have to follow in my footsteps,” he laughs.

 

Veejaro noted start-up capital to be an integral part of drifting that was vital prior to pursuing it seriously.

“It’s a dangerous sport and anything could happen so you have to go through every nut and bolt.”

 

Fresh from his win, Veejaro hopes to place South African drifting firmly on the international map, specifically in the United Kingdom where fans have called for him to perform.

The competition was held at Wheelz n Smoke in Johannesburg and saw 16 entrants duke it out for the prize which Hendricks took home after winning the competitions four gruelling rounds.

Hendricks, or Veejaro as he is popularly known, caught the motor bug in his youth through driving his father’s car. After entering his first competition at the Macufe Arts Festival in 2005, Veejaro has never looked back.

Veejaro’s journey to the Red Bull Shay’ iMoto competition was anything but smooth, after many delays and his wife giving birth shortly prior to the competition, Veejaro was under pressure to perform with a car that he was driving for the first time.

“I was in the toilet most of that week with butterflies in my stomach but we pulled it off.”

While his construction company has kept food on the table for his wife and kids, Veejaro shares that he still gets a lot of flak and stress being part of the drifting community. His family and community in Nigel have however shown immense support.

“A lot of people think we are hooligan, that we are wasting our money or that the sport is reckless,” says Veejaro who notes many communities where spinning takes place now boast arenas that are often packed with audiences, “no one has died because of spinning. No one has gotten hurt because of spinning but by the grace of God they will pull through and we will win them over.”

Veejaro also gushes that he hopes one of his children will follow in his footsteps.

“My wife and I had a small argument about that because I only have girls but I promise you one of them will have to follow in my footsteps,” he laughs.

Veejaro noted start-up capital to be an integral part of drifting that was vital prior to pursuing it seriously.

“It’s a dangerous sport and anything could happen so you have to go through every nut and bolt.”

Fresh from his win, Veejaro hopes to place South African drifting firmly on the international map, specifically in the United Kingdom where fans have called for him to perform.

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