Sho Madjozi gets more international recognition with New York Times feature

Sho Madjozi gets a New York Times feature.
Sho Madjozi gets a New York Times feature.
Image: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

Global star, Sho Madjozi is having a really good year and keeps collecting win after win  and her recent win is a feature in the New York Times. 

Known for being proud of her Tsonga heritage, the feature acknowledged that Sho was a force to be reckoned with in the African culture. 

In a biography type interview with the publication, the Huku hitmaker explained that being Tsonga “wasn’t cool,” hence she saw the need to change that.

In it Sho also reflected on how she acquired her sound. "My early songs and poems were about asserting my independence as a young black woman in South Africa, and being rebellious.”

She also added, "It was big for a woman to be talking about boys, about alcohol, about partying because Tsonga culture tends to be a little bit conservative.”

Flying the flag high, Sho made this year's Forbes Africa 30 under 30 list in July. 

Earlier this year Sho also bagged a BET award for the best international act. 

During a previous interview with the SowetanLIVE sister publication Sunday Times, Sho said, "A lot of African artists, when they are trying to be the face of Africa to the world, they try to make music they think Europeans will like. I don't bother with that. I make music I know my cousins in the village will like."

She added that she makes music for people in Limpopo. "It would be absolutely meaningless to me if I was a star in Europe and not known or loved in Limpopo. I would be completely devastated."

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