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Rumour-mongering spoils politics

There are people who believe President Cyril Ramaphosa reports to the Stellenbosch mafia, if there is such, the writer says.
There are people who believe President Cyril Ramaphosa reports to the Stellenbosch mafia, if there is such, the writer says.
Image: Thapelo Morebudi

Our nation, especially among blacks, believe rumours easily. This is dangerous. In the past, many people died, and some were injured (physically, mentally and emotionally), because of rumours. This must come to a stop.

In the past, many innocent people were killed because they were said to be "sellouts" or "impimpi". All it took was one person to label them as impimpi, without providing proof. That was enough for innocent victims to be killed.

In addition, there are people who believe President Cyril Ramaphosa reports to the Stellenbosch mafia, if there is such. And that Ramaphosa is filthy rich because of the Stellenbosch mafia. Is that a fact?

Interestingly, some also believe EFF leader Julius Malema is a pawn of white monopoly capital. There is a story that Malema takes instructions from Britain. I thought Malema hates white monopoly capitalists? Maybe I'm wrong.

There are also those who believe the late Nelson Rholihlahla Mandela sold out the country to whites during negotiations. That's why blacks are still poor and struggling to this day, assert these theorists.

The common one is that former president Jacob Zuma is a victim of politics. According to Zuma supporters, all the charges laid against him are politically motivated. The claim is that he is persecuted for championing radical economic transformation. And people believe that.

Also that Operational Dudula, under the leadership of Nhlanhla Lux Dlamini, who was recently arrested for vandalism, is supported financially by white business. The rumour says the ploy is to cause black on black violence.

All the advocates of these rumours are yet to provide proof. Yet they present them so boldly. Remember, in politics perception is everything. So you don't need to provide proof, you just have to create a perception.

That said, rumours will always be there. There will always be people who say things about others without providing proof. There is nothing we can do about that. However, they need to be seen for what they are: rumours.

Thabile Mange, Mogale City

 

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