Train more snake catchers

Members of Reaction Unit SA and snake catcher Jason Arnold removed a 2.4m black mamba from a factory in Durban.
Members of Reaction Unit SA and snake catcher Jason Arnold removed a 2.4m black mamba from a factory in Durban.
Image: Reaction Unit South Africa

Most parts of the Southern African region are currently experiencing persistent rainfall and it is common knowledge that snakes, in these conditions, also come out of hiding to seek warmer shelters.

Though important to our ecosystem, some of these snakes deliver bites that can lead to impairment or death. We need to live cautiously with these snakes, while protecting ourselves and conserving wildlife and human safety.

Wildlife organisations should start training programmes on snake catching. We need licensed snake catchers who can safely remove poisonous snakes away from where people live.

Furthermore, there is a great need, especially in this rainy season, for the medical institutions to have adequate supplies of the anti-venom medicine for snake bite casualties.

Academies should initiate first aid training programmes, especially in remote rural areas. Community members need to be trained on how to administer simple first aid to the victims of snake bikes.

Batsirai Kativu, Johannesburg

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